Recipes – Chinese SPICY Hot Chili Oil Recipe 2.0

43
5

Its been three years since I made my first cooking video on this channel, so in celebration I came up with another hot oil version. This is Shaanxi style hot oil, hope you like it!

★Here’s my first hot oil recipe!: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZlIiADdh-QY&t=1s

▼Ingredients:
1.5 c Vegetable Oil
3/4c Crushed Red Chilis
2tbs Sesame Seeds
4-5 Garlic Cloves
1tsp Salt
3tbs Chinese Peppercorn http://amzn.to/2rYXIIu
3 Bayleaves
1 Cinnamon Stick
4 Star Anis
1 Cardamom Seed http://amzn.to/2sKwF0p
Sesame Oil
Chinese Black Vinegar http://amzn.to/2sycAfq

►Subscribe for more videos about food! http://bit.ly/1hsxh41

★↓FOLLOW ME ON SOCIAL MEDIA!↓★
Facebook Show Page: https://www.facebook.com/strictlydumpling
Facebook Mike Fan Page: https://www.facebook.com/mikeychenx
Stricly Dumpling Instagram: http://instagr.am/haveadumpling
Personal Instagram: http://instagr.am/Mikexingchen
Twitter: http://twitter.com/Mikexingchen
Vine: https://vine.co/Mikexingchen
Snapchat: Mikeychenx
Periscope: Mikexingchen

~Send stuff at our PO Box!
Mike Chen
PO Box 610
Middletown, NY 10940

——————————

Get tickets to the best show on earth!!! http://bit.ly/2oDDr4o

source

43 COMMENTS

  1. I chickened out and instead of pouring the oil over the chillies in he storage jar (which for me was just going to be a glass jar), I put the chillies etc in a pyrex jug ad poured the hot oil into that and only transferred it to the jar later.

    Utterly delicious and goes with everything. OK, I didn't try it with ice cream either.

  2. Okay so I replaced the Asian peppercorn with regular black peppercorn. Also I replaced the red chilli flakes with habanero flakes. Followed the recipe, and it tastes Woody? Does your version of hot oil tastes a little Woody?

  3. Is there any substitute for vegetable oil? Because vegetable oils are extremely unhealthy and cause inflammation. They are empty calories and often are heavily processed with added dyes and chemicals.
    Will any high smoke point oil do? What flavored oils should go best with the peppers? Would you need to make an entirely different recipe if you change the base (the oil)?

  4. Recently made this (way better than the first version). Found all of the ingredients at a local Chinese supermarket which weren't expensive at all. Use it on almost everything, every day

    This stuff takes even the crappiest of instant ramen or plain white rice to the next level. The fragrant combination of heat and numbing is awesome

  5. I just made this recipe today and mine looks more brown than red and has a toasted smell to it. I followed your instructions on the oil but I’m thinking I got it too hot and burned the chilis.

  6. I LOVE Xi'an!!! Just got back a couple days ago and was missing the hot oil! I bought the red pepper flakes, cumin, cardamom, and chilies from the muslim market and was looking for the recipe!! Thanks for sharing Mike!!!

  7. @Strictly Dumpling: Since my chili oil is fairly similar to yours, I thought I'd return some of the help your channel has given me by sharing one of my recipes that heavily features it. Enjoy.

    ——————————————
    Sichuan-Inspired Doubanjiang Sauce (for alkalai style noodles)

    Ingredients: (combine in 2:2:2:1 ratio by volume)
    * Homemade Sichuan Chili Oil (a thick infusion of sichuan pepper infused hot oil, dried chilies, toasted nuts & garlic)
    * Pixian Doubanjiang Paste
    * Soba Tsuyu Dipping Sauce (aka Japanese Zarusoba sauce)
    * Homemade Red Jalapeno Jelly (alt: Thai sweet chili sauce)

    Directions:
    1) Shake the Sichuan Chili Oil (to re-suspend all the chilies, sichuan pepper, toasted nuts & garlic, etc.).
    2) Combine the ingredients in the indicated ratio in a small food processor, wet/dry grinder, or a large mortar, and process until mostly smooth & thickened but still slightly chunky/gritty. Adjust the balance of salty, umami, and sweet to taste … personally, I like just a hint of sweetness.
    3) If needed, thin slightly with a little additional oil, mirin and/or dry sake. You want it thick enough to adhere to pasta and not separate while dining, but thin enough to benefit from a vigorous shake if any oil has migrated to the surface of the jar since the last use.
    4) Store in sealed glass jar in fridge.
    5) USE: Toss with hot freshly drained (but not rinsed) homemade alkalai noodles, until well coated. If desired, add a little additional oil or hot water to loosen the finished dish. Optional garnish is thinly sliced scallions, a little sauteed minced or ground pork, and/or a side dish of pickled shallots or korean style pickles.

    Recipe Origin/Evolution:
    Origin: Entirely my own recipe, although technically it’s Asian-Fusion, rather than Sichuan in theme, and more of a dressing than a sauce, since it’s not cooked. I wanted a fast easy sauce centered around Pixian Doubanjiang (a traditional rich funky paste of salted broad beans and chilies that undergo a long slow fermentation in outdoor crocks, and then packed in jars and topped off with chili-infused oil). It should work equally well with most fresh alkalai noodles like homemade ramen, la mian, biang biang mian, or fresh udon.

    Comment: Doubanjiang paste is the centerpiece of this sauce – all the other ingredients are just there to round it out and balance it, and for that reason it is vital to pick a really good one with lots of broad beans and lots of chilies, and a deeply fermented flavor. As for the chili oil (which plays a strong secondary role) you want the thick kind with plenty of chopped nuts and toasted garlic – if it’s just store bought hot oil infused with fried chilies, you’ll need to decant some of the oil and re-infuse it with freshly toasted and ground sichuan pepper, chopped nuts and minced garlic, and mix the result back in to get the same effect as my version. Anyway, this addictive sauce hits all the right notes for me – spicy, savory, funky, salty, umami, and a hint of sweet. A rare walk-off home run, on the first try.

    Batch: There is no set batch size – I usually just make enough to fill an 8-12 oz jar, which I keep in the fridge, and use whenever desired. Figure about 1/3 cup of sauce is plenty for an individual portion of noodles.

  8. Story of how I threw up: Made mikes hot oil, was eating noodles, added some hot oil. Too unbelievably good, and not spicy enough (I'm Chinese) so I dumped the whole container……and it was way too good so I finished all of it in one meal…..

  9. I discovered chilli oil at a local vietnamese noodle house two pork chops with side soup full of glass noodles dump in chopped up pork chops then add chilli oil too your liking so amazing!! Trangs Noodle House Girrawheen Western Australia shout out!!

  10. Tried it without the peppercorns. OMG, ITS F’N ADDICTING. Ordered some szechuan peppercorns for the next batch. It’s 3:48am, and watching this vid and thinking of how good that first batch was, has me wanting to jump in the kitchen.

  11. Hello Mike! I love watching your vlogs. Thank you for sharing all of these great dishes and locations. I am dying to try tour hot oil, how long will this keep for and how do you store it? Fridge, pantry? Thank you and safe travels! 😊

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here